The Untold Truth About Your Yoga Practice

When we decide to take up yoga, we are like sponges, taking it all in.  We listen beyond playlists and try to absorb everything through sweaty pores and labored breath.  We do as we are told, and whether we know it or not, we are seeking something.  Major profundity or little tidbit, we find gratification whenever something resonates and we are thankful for any and all truths bestowed upon us.

Constantly inundated with articles, videos, instructions, cues, commentaries and such, you might wonder how could there possibly be any room left for an untold truth about your yoga practice.  Well, there is.

First, consider this.  When someone is brand new to yoga, the tendency is to put themselves in a position of externalizing the source of their wisdom.  This isn't a bad thing necessarily.  However, if we mindlessly do so, we risk turning away completely from our connection with our own inner wisdom.  At the same time, we risk adopting a habit of looking to someone else for guidance.  Not life or death, but not all good either.

Conversely, when we seek wisdom and guidance from others mindfully, it becomes an ongoing act of faith.  It is an act of faith that your own wisdom has lead you to a space where you can receive.   There's purpose to the externalization.  Wisdom says: keep coming, keep listening, keep doing and something will happen, and happen for the better.  There's faith not only that whatever you receive is meant to serve you, but also that it is to be paired up with your current level of knowledge and awareness.  Together, what you know and what you gather will lead you onward.

Yoga is a healing practice.  If you come into it honestly and openly, at some point, there will be shit.  At some point, maybe even repeatedly, you will come into an awareness of your personal field of muck.  Illusion.  Trauma.  Story.  Old story.  Whether it causes you a small pause or it knocks you to your knees, at some point, you'll have an opportunity to examine something about yourself that which needs healing.  It is congruent with an essential aspect of the human existence, which is to grow, evolve, or somehow move towards wholeness.  So, let the trudging begin!  No mud, no lotus, right?

So here, after having said all of that, is the untold truth.

The real goodness of your practice, physical or non-physical, is only apparent in that moment where your wisdom is realized and experienced, for you, by you.  There's no secret, it's just unspoken.  There's nothing taboo either, it's just unspoken.  The magic, if you want to call it that, occurs in the space before the formation of words, where wisdom and awareness intersect.  In that space, truth resides.  In that space, your inner wisdom is shown for what it is, greater and more influential than you had imagined.

I happen to love that space.  It is there that the we realize that we are holding on to an old story, or that we are operating under a false belief, even a false identity.  It is there, in that still space, that we access our own power to heal ourselves, sometimes by changing course, sometimes by letting go, many times it's a combination of the two.  It is there that we receive the simple affirmations about the goodness and abundance of this life.  There, we experience realizations.  We experience truth.  Untold.

The really interesting question is, "Isn't it your innate wisdom that has led you to the practice, as a way of guiding you home, to Self?"  When considering such a proposition, maybe the question of faith has by now shifted.  Now, isn't it about "faith in what you are doing", more so than "faith in what someone else suggests that you do"?

In this moment, isn't there a realization that the underlying faith that fuels your practice has always been tied to something greater and more influential that you had imagined?